What is an interesting fact about Star nosed moles?

How did the star-nosed mole get its name?

The little mole, scientifically known as Condylura cristata, commonly lives in the wetlands and marshes of the eastern United States. As its name implies, it has a star for a nose — specifically, a snout made up of 22 fleshy tentacles, that form a fleshy, circular star.

Can moles swim?

While moles prefer to stay underground and dry, all moles can swim if the need arises. … They use their powerful arms to swim through the water, much like the way they move through the dirt. Some moles even swim underwater and can hold their breath for up to 10 seconds at a time.

How long do star-nosed moles live?

Considering its small reproductive output, it has been speculated that these animals may live up to 3 to 4 years. Record longevity in captivity, however, is only 2.5 years [0671]. Further studies may be necessary.

What type of animal is a star-nosed mole?

The star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) is a small mole found in moist, low areas in the northern parts of North America. It is the only member of the tribe having a touch organ with more than 25,000 minute sensory receptors, known as Eimer’s organs, with which this hamster-sized mole feels its way around.

Do moles have whiskers?

Moles do a lot of digging, as many gardeners know. But they don’t use whiskers to find their way around in the dark. Instead, they simply follow their noses. A new detailed study of tiny touch receptors, called “Eimer’s organs,” on the tip of a mole’s nose reveals how the animals do it.

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Do star-nosed moles hibernate?

None of the Adirondack insectivores hibernate, nor is this species an exception. Unlike Parascalops, the star-nosed mole tunnels through, and even moves on the surface of snow.

How fast does a star-nosed mole eat?

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have found that the star-nosed mole can eat 10 mouthful-size chunks of earthworm, one at a time, in 2.3 seconds, or 0.23 second a chunk. That is over 26 times as fast as Ms. Thomas in her record-shattering performance. In fact, it is the fastest eating ever measured in any mammal.