Can lupus rash be mistaken for rosacea?

Can lupus be misdiagnosed as rosacea?

“The 1% of those acne rosacea patients with the most severe disease are very often walking around misdiagnosed as having the butterfly rash of lupus,” Dr. Martin said at the 2016 Rheumatology Winter Clinical Symposium. Flushing and persistent redness characterize erythematotelangietatic rosacea.

What can be mistaken for rosacea?

There are many different types of dermatitis, but the two most commonly confused with rosacea are seborrheic dermatitis and eczema. Eczema is a type of dermatitis which can occur anywhere on the body. Caused by inflammation, eczema makes skin dry, itchy, red and cracked.

Is it malar rash or rosacea?

A malar rash can occur with many different diseases and conditions, from sunburn to lupus. It’s most often seen in people with rosacea. It may be scaly and sometimes itchy, but it doesn’t have bumps or blisters. It may also be painful.

What looks like rosacea but isn t?

Seborrheic Dermatitis

This skin condition is sometimes mistaken for rosacea. It often occurs along with rosacea, which can add confusion. Seborrheic dermatitis causes redness and burning where skin glands are located on the face.

How do I know if I have rosacea or lupus?

Like rosacea, lupus sufferers often have redness across the central portion of the face, often in a butterfly pattern. Although both rashes can be smooth in texture, especially in early rosacea, the presence of bumps and pimples, which rarely occur in a lupus flare, may help differentiate the two diseases.

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How is lupus different from rosacea?

Lupus and rosacea can both cause facial redness. However, the similarities end there. Rosacea only affects a patient’s skin or eyes, and does not produce other symptoms. On the other hand, lupus can cause a wide range of symptoms, including fatigue, joint pain, swelling, and hair loss.

Can you be misdiagnosed rosacea?

Patients are often confused and frustrated with the redness that appears on their skin, as rosacea is sometimes misdiagnosed, and acne-like pustules may form. Understanding the cause of the inflammation allows our physicians to develop an accurate and effective treatment plan that will reduce visible flushing.

Why did I suddenly develop rosacea?

Anything that causes your rosacea to flare is called a trigger. Sunlight and hairspray are common rosacea triggers. Other common triggers include heat, stress, alcohol, and spicy foods. Triggers differ from person to person.